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FBI Uncovers Al-Qaeda Plot To Just Sit Back And Enjoy Collapse Of United States
"One day the war will be over & I can return to my poem"

"One day the war will be over & I can return to my poem"

(via ftyani)

As human works have gradually come to cover the vast spaces where the world was asleep, to the point that the very idea of virgin nature now belongs to the myth of Eden (there are no more islands), peopling the deserts, sub-dividing the beaches, and even erasing the sky with flights of planes, leaving untouched only those regions where it so happens that man cannot live, likewise, and simultaneously, the feeling for history has gradually covered the feeling for nature in the hearts of men…

And all this through an impulse so powerful & irresistible that the day can be foreseen when silent natural creation will have yielded altogether to human creation, hideous & flashing, resounding with revolutionary & warlike clamours, humming with factories and trains, at last definitive & triumphant in the course of history - having completed its task on this earth, which was perhaps to prove that everything grandiose & staggering it could accomplish throughout thousands of years was not worth the fleeting scent of the wild rose, the olive grove, the beloved dog…

Albert Camus

Notebook V: September 1945 - April 1948

Ashol-pan: A 13-year-old eagle huntress in Mongolia

We are all unhappy. Our country has paved the way for our angers & our quarrels. Each of us lives behind an impenetrable wall, despising all others. Our only real enemies are the priests, the crown, the police, hiding their faces & exciting us one against another.

… all this mire to become a man and not a machine for hatching hatred… The only things I love are art, children, and death.

Alexander Blok

a Russian poet, who gave voice to the idealism which would motivate the October Revolution, only to grow disillusioned with the subsequent injustices committed in the Revolution’s name.

Young was I once, I walked alone,
and bewildered seemed in the way;
then I found me another and rich I thought me,
for man is the joy of man.

stanza 47, “sayings of the high one”

Hávamál

Former United States Secretary of Defense, Donald Rumsfeld, discusses his career in Washington D.C. from his days as a congressman in the early 1960s to planning the invasion of Iraq in 2003.

➜ Mobb Deep: The Infamous / The Infamous Mobb Deep reissue

by Jayson Greene

Havoc and Prodigy have reissued their classic album The Infamous via a PledgeMusic-funded project. In addition to the original album, they are including a disc of rare and unreleased tracks from the sessions along with a full new album, confusingly, called The Infamous Mobb Deep.

The foreboding, faraway skree announcing Mobb Deep’s “Shook Ones Pt. II” is one of rap’s most perfect sounds—but what is it? It might be a horn. But it also might be an exploding steam pipe, or a car alarm, or a laser-jet printer. An even stranger sound follows it: four notes played on either a guitar imitating a piano or a piano imitating a guitar. The line is so disorienting that it inspired a sixteen-year long hunt for its source, which only ended in 2011 when producer Havoc confessed that sample snitches had finally pinpointed their target – a three-second piece of a Herbie Hancock instrumental, sped up and then slowed down. Playing the sample back to back with its source does absolutely nothing to resolve the mystery of “Shook Ones Pt II.”

For the kids who made it—Albert “Prodigy” Johnson, from Hempstead, and Kejuan “Havoc” Muchita, from Queensbridge—”Shook Ones Pt. II” was half war cry, half last gasp. It announced The Infamous, Mobb Deep’s second album and their first classic, and in the canon of career-revitalizing rap singles—Kool Moe Dee’s “How Ya Like Me Now”, LL Cool J’s “Mama Said Knock You Out”, Dre’s “Still D.R.E.”—”Shook Ones Pt. II” is maybe the most effective, and certainly the most devastating.  The song was a rebirth, and the album that it foreshadowed would rewrite their legacy entirely.

The Infamous was not supposed to happen. Johnson and Muchita had already gotten their shot, releasing a corny, forgettable debut called Juvenile Hell in 1993 that sold 20,000 copies before being dwarfed by Illmatic, which had already traveled the world as a demo before its official release in April of ‘94. At every radio interview, Havoc and P found themselves answering questions about Havoc’s Queensbridge neighbor Nas. In his 2011 memoir My Infamous Life, Prodigy recalls “Halftime” pumping out of the speakers at what was supposed to be a Mobb Deep in-store in D.C. Shortly afterward, Mobb Deep were dropped from their label.

They retreated, licking their wounds, to Havoc’s mother’s house. In New York, things were getting increasingly serious–Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers), also released in ‘93, had already shipped platinum by May of ‘94. A revolution was brewing in their own city, and the authors of puerile kiddie sex raps like “Hit it From the Back” were in danger of getting left behind forever. It was out of this brew of desperation and determination that The Infamous began to take shape. Their music took on a grimmer, darker tone.  

A few key people took notice. One was Schott Free, an A&R at Loud Records and former member of the short-lived rap group Legion of D.U.M.E.; another was Matteo “Matty C” Capoluongo, who ran The Source’s News section and wrote its venerated Unsigned Hype column. Capoluongo and Jacobs occasionally worked together on behalf raw, roughneck rap, the kind of stuff the industry required occasional nudging to embrace. It was Jacobs, for instance, who initially brought Wu-Tang’s “Protect Ya Neck” into The Source offices. He and Matty C slipped Mobb Deep’s new single, the fierce and focused “Patty Shop”, to influential DJs Stretch and Bobbito. Word spread, albeit faintly, that the duo might yet have new life in them.

The third important figure behind The Infamous is Q-Tip, whose bemused presence floats over Mobb Deep’s early career. When they were still teenagers hungry for a record deal, Havoc and Prodigy accosted Tip outside of the Def Jam offices. He obligingly ushered the duo into the hallowed offices of Lyor Cohen, whereupon they rewarded him by accidentally shooting a Def Jam employee in the stomach. He didn’t give up on them, however, and on The Infamous, he does enough work to qualify as a temporary third member—co-producing and rapping on two songs(“Give Up The Goods” and “Drink Away The Pain”) and working with Havoc to refine and perfect the album’s indelible atmosphere.

It is that atmosphere that lingers, untouched and intact, now that Havoc and Prodigy are reissuing the album via a PledgeMusic-funded project. In addition to the original album, they are including a disc of rare and unreleased tracks from the sessions along with a full new album, confusingly, also called The Infamous Mobb Deep. The branding is odd, and the timing for the project feels a little off: For one, they are claiming a 20th-anniversary celebration for The Infamous a full year ahead of schedule. For another, the duo recently suffered through a highly publicized, and extremely ugly, split while Prodigy was in prison. Maybe the reissue functions as a renewal of the vows between the two, a way to patch up relations while reminding rap fans, and themselves, of the potential power of a flagging, listless brand.

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trashhand:

had a great time with PF Flyers and Sir and Madame shooting photos for their pop-up in Hyde Park, Chicago. I’m a huge fan of vintage posters so the back wall was one of my favorite set-ups. make sure to check out the entire recap, here. 

Scan from Tokyo Tattoo 1970
Photography by Martha Cooper

Scan from Tokyo Tattoo 1970

Photography by Martha Cooper

➜ Poverty ‘ages’ genes of young children, study shows

by Marisa Taylor

Researchers find that growing up in poor and unstable environments affects 9-year-old black boys on a genetic level

The stress of growing up in a poor and unstable household affects children as young as 9 years old on a genetic level, shortening a portion of their chromosomes that scientists say is a key indicator of aging and illness, according to a study released Monday. The researchers say their findings are the first that document this type of genetic change among minority children and make a strong case for the importance of early-childhood intervention in vulnerable communities.

Researchers examined the DNA of a small group of 9-year-old African-American boys who had experienced chronic stress as a result of growing up in families with poor socioeconomic status. They found that the boys’ telomeres were shorter than those of boys the same age and ethnicity who came from advantaged families.

Telomeres are repetitive sequences of DNA found at the ends of chromosomes that function as a sort of cap to protect the genetic information when the DNA replicates. The telomeres become shorter each time DNA replicates, and studies have shown that stress accelerates that shortening, serving as a sort of genetic weathering that’s similar to aging.

The scientists were surprised to find significant associations between the shortening of the boys’ telomeres and low family income, low levels of maternal education, family instability and a harsh parenting style, compared with boys who came from higher-income and more stable and nurturing backgrounds. In addition, disadvantaged boys who had a genetic sensitivity to dopamine and serotonin — neurotransmitters connected with happiness and feeling pleasure — experienced accelerated shortening of their telomeres, pushing them farther down the road toward stress and sickness.

“Originally, I think we thought that we’d see it with the mothers of these kids,” said Colter Mitchell, lead author of the study and a faculty research fellow at the University of Michigan’s Population Studies Center and Survey Research Center. “But I think more surprising is that we see it as young as 9.”

The group’s findings were published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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In Designing News, award-winning editorial and infographics designer Francesco Franchi conveys his vision for the future of the news and media industries. He evaluates the fundamental changes that are taking place in our digital age in terms of consumer expectations and the way media is being used. The book then outlines the challenges that result and proposes strategies for traditional publishing houses, broadcasting companies, journalists, and designers to address them.
Designing News explores how today’s media outlets can become credible, cross-platform news brands. Franchi advocates redefining reporting as telling a continuous narrative across a broad range of traditional and digital media. To this end, he proposes a new, integrated role for editorial designers in advancing the evolution of media for the future.
Franchi’s findings in Designing News are based on his own work for Il Sole 24 ORE as well as case studies by top media insiders including Bloomberg Businessweek’s Richard Turley, Thomson Reuters’s Daniele Codega, the New York Times’s Steve Duenes, the Times’s Matt Curtis, and type designer Christian Schwartz.
thesubtlextremist:
Intend on getting this at some point, though judging from the title itself, one already wonders if Francesco Franchi touches on the political motives & dynamics which shape the “designing” of news in the first place. Any focus on a purely aesthetic argument really doesn’t do the subject any justice, yet we seem, in this day & age, to be concerned about nothing else.

In Designing News, award-winning editorial and infographics designer Francesco Franchi conveys his vision for the future of the news and media industries. He evaluates the fundamental changes that are taking place in our digital age in terms of consumer expectations and the way media is being used. The book then outlines the challenges that result and proposes strategies for traditional publishing houses, broadcasting companies, journalists, and designers to address them.

Designing News explores how today’s media outlets can become credible, cross-platform news brands. Franchi advocates redefining reporting as telling a continuous narrative across a broad range of traditional and digital media. To this end, he proposes a new, integrated role for editorial designers in advancing the evolution of media for the future.

Franchi’s findings in Designing News are based on his own work for Il Sole 24 ORE as well as case studies by top media insiders including Bloomberg Businessweek’s Richard Turley, Thomson Reuters’s Daniele Codega, the New York Times’s Steve Duenes, the Times’s Matt Curtis, and type designer Christian Schwartz.

thesubtlextremist:

Intend on getting this at some point, though judging from the title itself, one already wonders if Francesco Franchi touches on the political motives & dynamics which shape the “designing” of news in the first place. Any focus on a purely aesthetic argument really doesn’t do the subject any justice, yet we seem, in this day & age, to be concerned about nothing else.

Little bay before Tenès, at the foot of the chains of mountains. Perfect half-circle. As evening falls, a ripeness full of anguish hangs over the silent waters.

Then one realizes that if the Greeks formed the idea of despair & tragedy, they always did so through beauty & its oppressive quality. It’s a tragedy that culminates. Whereas the modern mind based its despair on ugliness & mediocrity.

For the Greeks, beauty is a point of departure. For [the modern], it’s an end, rarely achieved. I am not modern.

Albert Camus

Notebook VI: April 1948 - March 1951

THEME BY PARTI